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purina and north shore animal league america
Support Pet Adoption and Rescue. Why go to a breeder or pet store to buy a pet when you can adopt?

Search and see photos of adoptable pets in the Los Angeles, California area

Adopt-a-Pet.com is the easiest way for you to search for a new pet in Los Angeles, California

Contact this shelter/rescue group to see their pets for adoption.

Our Featured Los Angeles, CA Partner:

RabbitMatch.org - Los Angeles

Pet adoption saves lives. Adopt a pet and you'll have a friend for life! Contact us, or contact another local humane society, animal shelter or SPCA.

PO Box 642839
Los Angeles, CA 90064

http://www.RabbitMatch.org

Pets at Our Rescue Group:

Cities, Towns, and/or Counties We Serve:

Los Angeles, California
and the Planet Earth, in general

About Our Rescue Group:

House rabbits are 100% VEGAN & GREEN companions.

House rabbits eat 90% hay,
green veggies + a little bit of rabbit pellets 2 x per day.

They're litterbox trained (if spayed/neutered)
and quiet.

They have no animal odor, they're 99% non-allergic, have no dander
and clean themselves scrupulously.

They 'recycle' hay that makes great organic garden fertilizer. ; )

plus you get binkies and nosebonks.
http://rabbitmatch.posterous.com/the-real-energizer-bunny

RabbitMatch is a 501c3 project of SaveOurPlanet.org. We're an all-volunteer nonprofit that rehomes house rabbits.

Donate to Our Rescue Group...

https://www.paypal.com/us/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_flow&SESSION=OxX8BKRPrJjfqPoi3EsAG71M__OLINR2mgv2mxM23FCdQhkdxXOwoabyHKC&dispatch=5885d80a13c0db1f998ca054efbdf2c29878a435fe324eec0031f109add79ef7

Come Meet our Pets:

Rabbits make wonderful companions and rather than buying a rabbit for sale at a pet store or rabbit breeder, adopting a rabbit from an animal shelter or rescue organization is the perfect way to add a rabbit to your family. Today's rabbits are indoor, spayed/neutered and litter box trained.

First, is your home right for a rabbit?

DO YOU HAVE animals that could scare, wound or kill a rabbit? (Many dogs were bred to capture small animals.) Rabbits can die of fright!

DO YOU HAVE the time and energy for a rabbit? They’re high maintenance companions. Every day, twice a day they need green veggies, pellets, water, and hay. Their litter box needs cleaning every two days. Rabbits are social and need human or rabbit company and plenty of space to run around.

ARE YOU PREPARED for a rabbit who lives 10+ years? What will happen to your rabbit when you move, get married, have kids? What if your kids lose interest? Your rabbit cannot survive without you.

DOES EVERYONE in your family want a rabbit? Does anyone have asthma, allergies or hay fever? People are rarely allergic to rabbits but may be allergic to the hay they eat.

CAN YOU AFFORD the supplies and medical care your bunny needs? Rabbits can cost $50-$100 per month for supplies alone. Vet care for rabbits is more expensive than dogs and cats. Spaying and neutering a rabbit costs more too (unless you adopt from a reputable rescue or shelter).

IF YOU RENT your home, does your landlord allow rabbits? Will you move if you have to?

DO YOU HAVE enough room for a rabbit? You’ll need a space at least 4x4 ft (minimum) or a room for your rabbit. Rabbits need exercise and social interaction to be happy and healthy.

IS YOUR HOME bunny-proofed with electrical and computer cords covered or placed out of reach? Have houseplants and dangerous chemicals been moved to safe places? Anything in your rabbit’s room may be chewed by your bun!

WILL YOU BE available to supervise children when they’re around the rabbit? Rabbits are easily injured when picked up by someone who doesn’t know how. Rabbits can bite and scratch when frightened.

BEFORE YOU ADOPT, have all your supplies in place.

WHEN YOU ADOPT, ask questions! Rescues are happy to help!

Excerpted from House Rabbit Society (http://www.rabbit.org) materials

There's a lot to know when you provide a home for a rabbit. You'll need to learn what to feed them, how much exercise and attention your rabbit needs and many other important things about how to live beside and care for a house rabbit. Rescues can give you the information you need to have a happy (er, hoppy!), healthy, active rabbit friend.

A great resource is the House Rabbit Society. http://www.rabbit.org
or
visit our blog at http://rabbitmatch.posterous.com

Pet adoption saves lives. Adopt a pet and you'll have a friend for life! Please consider a rescue pet before you buy a pet from a breeder or pet store. Contact us, or a local rescue, humane society, animal shelter or SPCA.

Our Adoption Process:

Please fill out the application on our website for an appointment. http://rabbitmatch.org/stepone.html We'll let the bunnies know you're coming!

Why should you adopt?

rabbits can make wonderful pets, and rather than buying a rabbit for sale or finding a rabbit breeder, adopting a rabbit from an animal shelter or rescue organization is the perfect way to add a rabbit to your family. Keep in mind, there is a lot you will need to know when you provide a home for a rabbit. You will need to learn what to feed them, how much exercise or attention your rabbit needs, and many other important things about how to house and care for a rabbit. There are different types of rabbits including American; American Fuzzy Lop; American Sable; Angora, English; Angora, French; Angora, Giant; Angora, Satin; Belgian Hare; Beveren; Blanc de Hotot; Britannia Petite; Californian; Champagne D'Argent; Checkered Giant; Chinchilla, American; Chinchilla, Giant; Chinchilla, Standard; Cinnamon; Creme D'Argent; Dutch; Dwarf; Dwarf Hotot; English Spot; Flemish Giant; Florida White; Harlequin; Havana; Himalayan; Jersey Wooly; Lilac; Lionhead; Lop, English; Lop, French; Lop, Holland; Lop-Eared; Mini Lop; Mini Rex; Mini Satin; Netherland Dwarf; New Zealand; Palomino; Polish; Rex; Rhinelander; Satin; Silver; Silver Fox; Silver Marten; Tan; and Thrianta.

Pet adoption saves lives. Adopt a pet and you'll have a friend for life! Please consider a rescue pet before you buy a pet from a breeder or pet store. Contact us, or contact another local humane society, animal shelter or SPCA.