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Mrrrrrowwwww! Nighttime cat yowling help

Posted by Jennifer on May 7th, 2013

Just as you drift off to dreamland, a small lion starts yowling in your living room… not really, but if you’ve had your sleep interrupted by a cat’s nocturnal caterwauling, you may have thought it would sound about the same! The word “caterwauling” according the Webster dictionary is “to make a harsh cry; to protest or complain noisily” and we’re sure it got the “cat” part of its name from the cries that neighborhood cats make as they prowl around at night. So why is your indoor cat singing the street blues? Read on to find out many of the possible whys, and some possible solutions so you both can sleep the whole night through! Remember, new behavior takes about two weeks to get established, so don’t give up too soon.

Truth: Cats are nocturnal. However, they are also creatures of habit. If your cat is in the habit of sleeping all day, and having a party (on your head) all night, you can take steps to reset their internal clock. Tip: Play play play all day with your cat! If you work all day, make time in the morning before you leave from work, and especially when you come home at night, to play until your cat is worn out tired. Bonus tip: If you have a cat that is just not that interested in toys, you can get them interested in food games. Don’t free feed, and divide their meal up into ten portions, and make them follow you walking around before you put it down for them to eat it.

Truth: Cats like attention. If you are paying any attention to your cat because they are waking you up at night, that’s rewarding their nightime yowling. Even yelling at your cat is giving them attention! Tip: it can be tough, but get some ear plugs and ignore that night time yowling.

Truth: cats get sleepy after they eat, just like humans when they eat a big meal. Tip: feed your cat his main big meal later at night, right before your bed time, after your big play session. This of course only works if you are not free-feeding!

Truth: Cats can be territorial. If your neighborhood cats are prowling around outside your window, your cat may be defending his territory, or having a conversation with that sexy kitty from the next block. Tip: Training you cat to walk on a harness and leash outside around your house before bedtime can let them mark their territory outside, and relieve that urge to do so vocally inside. Motion detector sprinklers or lights can also sometimes help keep outside cats farther away from your home.

We hope these caterwauling prevenion tips help you and your cat. Did you like this article? Click an icon below to share on Facebook, Twitter, and more!

 
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