top

My name is Esperanza!

Terrier (Unknown Type, Medium) Mix Dog for adoption in Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Esperanza
Photo 1 - Terrier (Unknown Type, Medium) Mix Dog for adoption in Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Esperanza
Photo 2 - Terrier (Unknown Type, Medium) Mix Dog for adoption in Fort Lauderdale, Florida - Esperanza
Pet Video
Add me to your favorites

I'm being cared for by:
Good Karma Pet Rescue

Facts about Esperanza

  • Breed: Terrier (Unknown Type, Medium) Mix
  • Color: Brindle - With White
  • Age: Adult
  • Size: Med. 26-60 lbs (12-27 kg)
  • Sex: Female
  • ID#: 10611357-Courtesy listing

 Hi, I'm Esperanza! I love playing with kids and going on walkies. I'm about two years old, weighing about 40 pounds, and am very sweet. I get a little scared of other doggies when I'm being walked or brought to the vets office, but am good with other doggies in a relaxed setting. I'm hyper and I love to play and a lot of attention. I love car rides, the beach, and bath time. I'm vet checked, spayed, and fully vaccinated.

Please contact Angelica Circelli and Colleen Hegarty if interested in adopting! 
954-404-3903 
774-319-9472

 Colleen Hegarty started the initiative “Zoo Dogs of Bahrain,” which aims to rescue, rehabilitate, and rehome cats and dogs from Arman Zoo in Bahrain, a small country off the coast of Saudi Arabia, where she was on a 10 month long government sponsored Fulbright Grant to compliment her degree in Middle East Studies and Arabic. It was there that she stumbled upon 'Arman Zoo,' where dogs and cats are kept alongside animals such as alligators and baboons to provide entertainment for the public. The zoo has previously made international headlines for abusing a monkey. Here is her account of her experience at the zoo:

'I was initially shocked upon entering the zoo- animal abuse had been completely normalized and visitors not only enjoyed, but made animals' conditions worse by banging on cages, throwing rubbish at animals, provoking animals, and poking animals with sticks through the cages. What was most surprising to me was that cats and dogs were in cages alongside baboons and alligators. Cats, ribs visible and missing large patches of fur, were starving and clinging on to the sides of the cages begging for a morsel of food, while in the background sat the zoo's 20+ antique premium cars. Large breed dogs hid in the backs of their cages hoping to not attract attention while visitors paid the equivalent of $3 to “walk” smaller breeds around. The skin on their paws were burnt and their tongues hung out without any access to water during the hot midday sun (with temperatures regularly over 100 degrees) and children continued to drag and kick them as they whimpered and tried to stop walking. Originally, I convinced the zoo manager to let me put ten dogs (now twenty) and all mixed breed cats (but I ended up taking the Himalayans as well, totaling to 24 cats) up for adoption- animals he said he has 'no use for'. The dogs I took either couldn’t be bred or sold because they were “mixed” breeds or were too sick to be walked by children or bred. I created a successful gofundme to treat and neuter the dogs and cats and prepare them for adoption. The dogs taken out of the zoo had tick fever and were covered in ticks and matted; some dogs were malnourished, had colitis from severe cases of worms, had to have oral surgery for 10+ rotten teeth, had broken knee caps, broken tails, broken jaws, and severe anxiety and food aggression disorders. Cats were so skinny that you could feel every bone in their spine and ribs. Cats were starving and developed mouth ulcers as a result. They were malnourished and covered in fleas and anemic from the fleas and in addition suffered from other conditions like ringworm and eye infections. One cat passed away from severe health issues he suffered as a result of conditions at the zoo. The last cat removed from the zoo was pregnant and had a broken, bleeding nose from being beaten by a zoo worker, which was witnessed by two visitors.'



About Good Karma Pet Rescue

About Our Rescue Group...

Good Karma Pet Rescue is a small network of foster homes in South Florida dedicated to providing dogs and cats in need with the love and help they need and deserve.

GK was started in 2011 by Stacey Chen, who decided that she could best provide for her foster animals by starting a rescue that aims for best care rather than high volume. We intend to stay as small as we need to be to ensure that every one of our foster animals is treated with the same care and respect we show our own furry family.

GK is based in Fort Lauderdale and is supported by wonderful, dedicated foster parents throughout the South Florida area. If you are interested in helping to save lives through volunteering, fostering, or adopting, please get in touch with us!

Come Meet Our Pets...

We meet potential adopters by appointment only, typically in the foster's or potential adopter's home. Dogs can be arranged to be seen at a local park or a similar location.

Our Adoption Process...

We have a quick but thorough adoption process. We ask you to fill out an application and we will touch base with you by phone. If we feel you are a good fit for the animal you would like to adopt based upon your application, we will want to do a home visit and have you meet the pet. If everything checks out, we will ask that you sign an adoption contract and pay a donation - usually $75 for cats and $150 for dogs. This includes all vetting, spay/neuter, vaccines, etc.

Our contract allows us to come visit you and your new family member after the adoption to make sure everything is going well and your new pet is happy & healthy.