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My name is REBECCA!

Other/Unknown for adoption in Boston, Massachusetts - REBECCA
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I'm being cared for by:
Animal Rescue League of Boston

Facts about REBECCA

  • Breed: Other/Unknown
  • Color: Unknown
  • Age: Young
  • Size: Standard
  • Sex: Female
  • ID#: 10813721-A253906
  • Hair: Medium
MEET REBECCA!

Rebecca is an extremely friendly and large rabbit. She loves being petted for as long as your arm isn''t tired, and she''s easy to pick up and hold. Her tempermant really stands out as one of the sweetest, gentlest rabbits.

She was originally from a hoarding case, but has since been taken in by our shelter and treated like a queen since she has been with us. She is very friendly and will hop right to the front of the cage for a chin scratch when anyone comes by. She is relatively clean and appears to use her litterbox most of the time.

Rabbit care is fairly easy to learn. Rabbits need an enclosure that is at least three times as long as their bodies and ideally twice their body length wide. The enclosure should be tall enough that the rabbit can stretch upwards and not touch the top with their ears. If the cage has a wire bottom, it must be covered with cardboard or paper liners. Ideally avoid sheets and towels as some rabbits chew on and ingest the fibers which can be fatal. They need access to clean hay and water at all times. Their diet should primarily consist of leafy greens, some vegetables, and small amounts of fruit, but they should also be supplemented with rabbit grain everyday served in an unchewable ceramic or glass bowl. They can learn to urinate and defecate in a litter box with time so provide them with one filled with absorbent, soft bedding that is big enough for them to fit their entire body. Rabbits need several hours per day of exercise outside of their cage. They need to be able to stretch their limbs, run and hop and tire themselves out everyday. This keeps them physically and mentally healthy and stops them from being destructive out of boredom. You can let them free roam in your home under your supervision, but make sure to keep them away from wires as they will chew them and could electrocute themselves. Many people set up an X Pen play area and move all the rabbits amenities into it for play time. Some cheap toy ideas are cardboard boxes, (without tape), toilet paper rolls, paper towel roles, crumpled plain paper, cereal boxes, phone books and any other paper/cardboard items you aren''t using anymore. All rubber and plastic items pose a danger as rabbits may chew and ingest them. The possibilities for rabbit enrichment are endless and it''s easy to do!

Please have a picture of the enclosure fully set up in your home when you come to adopt.
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About Animal Rescue League of Boston

About Our Shelter...

The Boston facility serves as the headquarters for the Animal Rescue League of Boston. The site houses the administrative offices, extensive animal housing, an adoption center, an outpatient veterinary clinic, four ambulances, and the majority of the law enforcement department.

Our Adoption Process...

.The Animal Rescue League of Boston requires the following documentation as part of the adoption process:

Proof that adopter is 21 years of age or older
A Massachusetts ID with valid current address (No Student IDs) - or any Government Issued ID along with piece of mail with current address (ie water bill, tax bill, phone bill etc)
Complete an application and interview with adoption personnel

Pet Adoption Fees
Cats 5 months and younger $200
Cats 6 months to 3 years $150
Cats 4 years to 7 years $125
Cats 8 years and older $100
Dogs 5 months and younger $450
Dogs 6 months to 7 years $300
Dogs 8 years and older $200
Rabbits $75, pair for $125
Guinea Pigs $35, pair $50
Ferrets $90, pair $150
Small Animals $25+, dependent on species
Birds $10-$150+, dependent on species

Adoption fee includes the following:
Initial health screening and veterinary examination
Initial vaccinations
Spaying or Neutering
Veterinary care valued at up to $200 should your pet develop a shelter-related illness within the first seven days of adoption
Rabies vaccination for dogs, cats and ferrets
Permanent microchip identification and registration
Heartworm test and 1st dose of preventative medication for dogs
1st dose of flea prevention/treatment for dogs and cats
Feline Leukemia test for cats
Deworming for intestinal parasites
Tag, collar, and leash or carrier