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My name is Outlander!
Adoption process
1.

Submit Application

2.

Approve Application

3.

Home Check

Adoption application
Apply to Adopt

Facts about me

Breed
Husky
Color
Tan/Yellow/Fawn - with Black
Age
1 year 2 months old, Adult
Size
(When grown) Med. 26-60 lbs (12-27 kg)
Weight
(Current) 31 lbs
Sex
Male
Pet ID

My info

Small blue checkmark Good with dogs
Small blue checkmark Shots current
Small blue checkmark Spayed / Neutered
Small blue checkmark Housetrained

My story

OUTLANDER - seeking my forever home!!

I am a happy, happy boy who learns a routine quickly. I have a lot of energy which is managed by having my regular walks and a few minutes of all out zoomies. So far I seem to be happy to meet everyone!! Like everyone!!! I am sure someone is looking for a friendly dog that is a manageable size. That would be me!! I love toys and can entertain myself with them. Please read on, apply for me or get the word out about me. Please?!

My name is Outlander and I am an approximately 1 year old male husky mix with lots of energy and personality plus. I may be small (weighing in at 30 pounds), but I don’t know it. I have an infectious energy and enthusiasm. I am a bundle of precious, playful, curious, eager, smart, cute, adorable, and friendly all packed into my smaller frame. I will win your heart with my gorgeous eyes as I seek to learn from you by following your direction. I have been both vaccinated, neutered, and microchipped.

There is a female husky in my foster home and the introduction was controlled with each of us on a leash and supported to approach slowly with a chance to sniff each other. We hang out in the same space nicely. On occasion she is bossy and I just ignore her. I have met other dogs in the same thoughtful manner and it went well. We have had a couple of temporary fosters who I liked even if they weren’t initially sure about me. We did go on nice walks together. I have not had exposure to cats or kids in my foster home. I have met many children at several events and all the interactions went exceptionally well.

When out of my crate inside and outside of the house I have been on a leash to help me learn rules and expectations. Now that I have been in my foster home longer than a month I am having supervised opportunities off leash in the fenced back run so that I can do my zoomies at a speed no human can likely go.

The leash is my communication tool; a “no touch, no talk” plan supports me to learn, and avoid unwanted behaviours. This plan is recommended to be repeated for thirty days when I move on to my adoptive home.

Inside the house I am working to self-calm as I can be quite excitable as I love to explore. One goal is for me to sit or lie quietly next to my fosters, and for this we use an activity called “sit on the dog”. Here they sit on my leash with only enough distance in the leash for me to lie down. For this activity there are no toys and no distractions. Again they do not touch, nor talk to me. I can do this well if I have had a walk or my zoomies, and don’t need to do my business.

I am learning that there is a rule against jumping up on furniture, people and any items that catch my curiosity. Having the leash on me inside the house has been exceptionally helpful to redirect me. I will jump on the sofa if given the chance because it’s the best spot to watch what everyone is doing.

I love my outdoor walks and get super excited when we head to the door. I am working on exiting the door safely so I don’t dart out. I understand sit, but we are still working on it because I can get wiggly. They want me stop and settle before going out the door. This is not easy for me yet; I want to get going. My foster goes out the door first.

We continue to work on walking nicely with the leash. Initially, I tried walking ahead like a determined boy on a mission, but I am learning to walk alongside my foster. To help me with my pace and attention, my foster mom will change directions on me quickly. We have practiced following her lead on the driveway where she walks and changes directions often. I am getting much better at this when I am the only dog. I am young and when too much is going on I can be easily distracted. It would be helpful for us to have some balanced training to help me reach my goals and to develop our bond together.

When I see people or dogs on our walks I introduce myself by barking. When we are on our walks my foster mom has showed me firmly with the leash to keep walking. If we find ourselves on the same side of the road of any reactive dogs, foster mom crosses the road to keep our distance. When I have seen bicycles I have been fine.

I have discovered the dog toy box and will quickly take out all the toys and play with them. Sometimes I hide some under the dog bed. It’s funny when they suddenly squeak when one of us walks on the bed.

I sleep in a crate with a stuffed toy and an antler. I currently have a sheet over the top and 4 sides of my crate at night to reduce stimulation and provide a darker environment. I sleep well when my foster family sleeps from 9:30pm to 6:30am.

I am fed in my crate and I am eager to enter the crate for my meals. Having my meal in there keeps it a positive environment. As soon as I come out of the crate at any time I am taken straight outside to pee. In the morning I return to my crate to eat and then shortly after we go for my morning walk.

I am crated during the day when my fosters are at work. I am very excited (anyone see the movie Happy Feet?) to get out of the crate when the fosters return home, and I love my afternoon walk.

When everyone is home indoors we spend a couple of hours in the crate and a couple out of the crate. I settle well in there and will head in without a fuss. I am in the crate on and off to give me time to settle and absorb my new learning.

With the nice weather I enjoy sitting on the deck with everyone, or relaxing on the grass. My fosters are trying to teach me to play with a ball; I will pick it up and run with it.

I have not had any accidents in my crate, and so far I have not peed in the house due to the initial diligent attention of my foster who stopped me from marking by paying close attention to my body language and hind legs. As I have gained some independence they believed they would have needed a belly band to cover up my bits to ensure I didn’t mark inside the house. They have never needed any belly band with me, nor do I wear one, but as foster mom says, it’s always good to know an item like that exists. When I arrived from the north I liked to mark frequently outside; therefore, foster mom made a plan that I have one good pee (foster mom lets me do it on a nature item like a bush but not her deck or planters) and then we focus on our walk.

I can get into the car Independently and I do well in the car. It’s best not to feed me right before a drive so I don’t get sick. It is important that my leash is secured when we are travelling to prevent me from hopping on to your lap or out the door when you stop the car.

If you are interested in me please check out my full profile and photos taken by Sarah Corona and Chris Veinotte, then please complete an application, at www.findingthemhomes.com
OUTLANDER - seeking my forever home!!

I am a happy, happy boy who learns a routine quickly. I have a lot of energy which is managed by having my regular walks and a few minutes of all out zoomies. So far I seem to be happy to meet everyone!! Like everyone!!! I am sure someone is looking for a friendly dog that is a manageable size. That would be me!! I love toys and can entertain myself with them. Please read on, apply for me or get the word out about me. Please?!

My name is Outlander and I am an approximately 1 year old male husky mix with lots of energy and personality plus. I may be small (weighing in at 30 pounds), but I don’t know it. I have an infectious energy and enthusiasm. I am a bundle of precious, playful, curious, eager, smart, cute, adorable, and friendly all packed into my smaller frame. I will win your heart with my gorgeous eyes as I seek to learn from you by following your direction. I have been both vaccinated, neutered, and microchipped.

There is a female husky in my foster home and the introduction was controlled with each of us on a leash and supported to approach slowly with a chance to sniff each other. We hang out in the same space nicely. On occasion she is bossy and I just ignore her. I have met other dogs in the same thoughtful manner and it went well. We have had a couple of temporary fosters who I liked even if they weren’t initially sure about me. We did go on nice walks together. I have not had exposure to cats or kids in my foster home. I have met many children at several events and all the interactions went exceptionally well.

When out of my crate inside and outside of the house I have been on a leash to help me learn rules and expectations. Now that I have been in my foster home longer than a month I am having supervised opportunities off leash in the fenced back run so that I can do my zoomies at a speed no human can likely go.

The leash is my communication tool; a “no touch, no talk” plan supports me to learn, and avoid unwanted behaviours. This plan is recommended to be repeated for thirty days when I move on to my adoptive home.

Inside the house I am working to self-calm as I can be quite excitable as I love to explore. One goal is for me to sit or lie quietly next to my fosters, and for this we use an activity called “sit on the dog”. Here they sit on my leash with only enough distance in the leash for me to lie down. For this activity there are no toys and no distractions. Again they do not touch, nor talk to me. I can do this well if I have had a walk or my zoomies, and don’t need to do my business.

I am learning that there is a rule against jumping up on furniture, people and any items that catch my curiosity. Having the leash on me inside the house has been exceptionally helpful to redirect me. I will jump on the sofa if given the chance because it’s the best spot to watch what everyone is doing.

I love my outdoor walks and get super excited when we head to the door. I am working on exiting the door safely so I don’t dart out. I understand sit, but we are still working on it because I can get wiggly. They want me stop and settle before going out the door. This is not easy for me yet; I want to get going. My foster goes out the door first.

We continue to work on walking nicely with the leash. Initially, I tried walking ahead like a determined boy on a mission, but I am learning to walk alongside my foster. To help me with my pace and attention, my foster mom will change directions on me quickly. We have practiced following her lead on the driveway where she walks and changes directions often. I am getting much better at this when I am the only dog. I am young and when too much is going on I can be easily distracted. It would be helpful for us to have some balanced training to help me reach my goals and to develop our bond together.

When I see people or dogs on our walks I introduce myself by barking. When we are on our walks my foster mom has showed me firmly with the leash to keep walking. If we find ourselves on the same side of the road of any reactive dogs, foster mom crosses the road to keep our distance. When I have seen bicycles I have been fine.

I have discovered the dog toy box and will quickly take out all the toys and play with them. Sometimes I hide some under the dog bed. It’s funny when they suddenly squeak when one of us walks on the bed.

I sleep in a crate with a stuffed toy and an antler. I currently have a sheet over the top and 4 sides of my crate at night to reduce stimulation and provide a darker environment. I sleep well when my foster family sleeps from 9:30pm to 6:30am.

I am fed in my crate and I am eager to enter the crate for my meals. Having my meal in there keeps it a positive environment. As soon as I come out of the crate at any time I am taken straight outside to pee. In the morning I return to my crate to eat and then shortly after we go for my morning walk.

I am crated during the day when my fosters are at work. I am very excited (anyone see the movie Happy Feet?) to get out of the crate when the fosters return home, and I love my afternoon walk.

When everyone is home indoors we spend a couple of hours in the crate and a couple out of the crate. I settle well in there and will head in without a fuss. I am in the crate on and off to give me time to settle and absorb my new learning.

With the nice weather I enjoy sitting on the deck with everyone, or relaxing on the grass. My fosters are trying to teach me to play with a ball; I will pick it up and run with it.

I have not had any accidents in my crate, and so far I have not peed in the house due to the initial diligent attention of my foster who stopped me from marking by paying close attention to my body language and hind legs. As I have gained some independence they believed they would have needed a belly band to cover up my bits to ensure I didn’t mark inside the house. They have never needed any belly band with me, nor do I wear one, but as foster mom says, it’s always good to know an item like that exists. When I arrived from the north I liked to mark frequently outside; therefore, foster mom made a plan that I have one good pee (foster mom lets me do it on a nature item like a bush but not her deck or planters) and then we focus on our walk.

I can get into the car Independently and I do well in the car. It’s best not to feed me right before a drive so I don’t get sick. It is important that my leash is secured when we are travelling to prevent me from hopping on to your lap or out the door when you stop the car.

If you are interested in me please check out my full profile and photos taken by Sarah Corona and Chris Veinotte, then please complete an application, at www.findingthemhomes.com
Rescue

Finding Them Homes-James Bay Pawsitive Rescue

Contact info
Pet ID
Contact
Phone
Address
Oro-Medonte, ON L0L 2E0

Their adoption process

1.

Submit Application

Visit www.findingthemhomes.com and complete an adoption application.

2.

Approve Application

All animals in the house must be spayed/neutered or medical letter explaining why they cannot be. If you rent, we do require a call from lan

3.

Home Check

All adoptions take place in Barrie, ON. We do not ship or transport for you. All approved applications will be subject to a home check.

Additional adoption info

We do not adopt outside of Ontario, Canada.
We do not adopt outside of Ontario, Canada.

Go meet their pets

Visit http://www.findingthemhomes.com/events for locations of meet and greets as well as other events to publicly meet our dog’s. As we are Foster based, upon approved application and home check, we can arrange for a private meet and greet.
Visit http://www.findingthemhomes.com/events for locations of meet and greets as well as other events to publicly meet our dog’s. As we are Foster based, upon approved application and home check, we can arrange for a private meet and greet.

More about this rescue

Our rescue specifically focuses on northern Ontario remote communities who have no other option for their dogs (owned or stray). We not only bring in unwanted dogs but visit the communities and perform spay and neuter clinics as there are not veterinarians within the communities. The majority of the communities are fly in communities only.
Our rescue specifically focuses on northern Ontario remote communities who have no other option for their dogs (owned or stray). We not only bring in unwanted dogs but visit the communities and perform spay and neuter clinics as there are not veterinarians within the communities. The majority of the communities are fly in communities only.