Adopt a Pet
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My name is Dream!
I'm being cared for by
They All Want To Live
Adoption process
1.

Interview

2.

Approve Application

3.

Home Check

Adoption application
Apply to Adopt

Facts about me

Breed
Pigeon
Color
Brown/White
Age
Sex
Male
Pet ID

My info

Small blue checkmark Good with kids
Small blue checkmark Good with birds

My story

Dream is a beautiful domestic pigeon who was abandoned outside, hungry, scared, and alone. Dream is used to being around humans, but still gets a little nervous being handled--but we think that with a little time and love, they will fully embrace and become an integral part of a new human family! Dream will make a wonderful companion and would do great in an indoor home, or an outdoor, predator-proofed aviary. We would prefer Dream to go to a home with a pigeon friend, or for the home to adopt a friend for Dream in the future. We do not know Dream's gender at this time (apart from DNA testing, gender of pigeons is generally determined based on behavior around other birds).
Dream is a beautiful domestic pigeon who was abandoned outside, hungry, scared, and alone. Dream is used to being around humans, but still gets a little nervous being handled--but we think that with a little time and love, they will fully embrace and become an integral part of a new human family! Dream will make a wonderful companion and would do great in an indoor home, or an outdoor, predator-proofed aviary. We would prefer Dream to go to a home with a pigeon friend, or for the home to adopt a friend for Dream in the future. We do not know Dream's gender at this time (apart from DNA testing, gender of pigeons is generally determined based on behavior around other birds).
Rescue

They All Want To Live

Contact info
Pet ID
Contact
Phone
Address
New York, NY 10026

Their adoption process

1.

Interview

We either do an interview or have the prospective adopter complete an adoption application (that varies by species)

2.

Approve Application

Only applicants with predator proof set ups will be approved. If they need to build, we wait until they have finished to approve them to ado

3.

Home Check

We do a home visit when we drop off the animal.

Additional adoption info

We have different applications depending on the species. The duck and chicken applications are on our website (see link in next field)
We have different applications depending on the species. The duck and chicken applications are on our website (see link in next field)

Go meet their pets

We do not have adoption events as it is too stressful on highly sensitive birds. Adopters can meet animals in foster homes.
We do not have adoption events as it is too stressful on highly sensitive birds. Adopters can meet animals in foster homes.

More about this rescue

We are an all-woman run, foster-based, animal rescue and advocacy organization based in New York. Together, our members bring to the group decades of experience in rescuing, rehabbing, and finding homes for some of the most routinely overlooked, mistreated, and exploited animals – ducks and chickens. Domestic fowl suffer by the billions each year, with few people advocating on their behalf or even aware of their plight. Over the last several years, we have worked tirelessly to rescue hundreds of birds from abandonment, neglect, and abuse. When working with animals, it becomes immediately apparent that they all have one thing in common – the will to live, and to live their lives in peace, comfort, and safety. Domestic fowl make up over 95% of the animals used in agriculture. This means that each year, billions of chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese and other birds are confined in horrific conditions for the duration of their short, miserable lives, before being brutally killed. Domestic fowl are exploited for the bodies in more diverse and extreme ways than any other animal—they are used for their meat, eggs, and down feathers. Chicks and ducklings are also routinely purchased and gifted around Easter and used in hatching projects. With no awareness of the care they need, most of these birds will die within days, or be abandoned when their novelty wears off or they grow to be too large and messy. Even their use for meat surpasses the torture inflicted upon other animals raised for food—ducks are used to make foie gras by being force-fed enormous quantities of grain via a metal tube shoved down their throats multiple times a day until they develop fatty liver disease, at which time they are killed and their diseased livers processed into the “luxury” item. Human beings have managed to find every possible way to exploit these gentle birds. Just like our companion and farm animals, ducks and geese were domesticated by humans thousands of years ago. These years of breeding resulted in animals vastly different from their wild counterparts, both physiologically and psychologically—just as domestic dogs are different from wolves. Despite being an act of animal cruelty, as well as illegal, the abandonment of these domestic ducks and geese is a constant occurrence in parks and on lakes when they are no longer wanted. Frequently the dumpers do not realize that their actions constitute a death sentence. Domestic ducks and geese depend entirely upon the care of humans to survive, no different than our “pet” dogs. Bred for either egg or meat production, they have large bodies and small wings, rendering them flightless and unable to escape predators or to find open water when the ponds freeze in winter. They also lack the survival instincts of wild birds. When abandoned on ponds, they do not know how to forage for naturally occurring food and often starve to death. They routinely succumb to attacks from predators (including raccoons, foxes, and snapping turtles) and cruelty by humans. Most domestic ducks and geese die within 24 to 48 hours of being dumped. If they survive until winter, they face diminishing natural food sources and ponds freezing over—either fully or partially—and they cannot migrate to find water, as the wild birds do. These abandoned animals often become frozen in place on the ice. Some will freeze to death (certain breeds are especially prone to frostbite), while others find themselves helpless against attacks. The rest die of dehydration or starvation.
We are an all-woman run, foster-based, animal rescue and advocacy organization based in New York. Together, our members bring to the group decades of experience in rescuing, rehabbing, and finding homes for some of the most routinely overlooked, mistreated, and exploited animals – ducks and chickens. Domestic fowl suffer by the billions each year, with few people advocating on their behalf or even aware of their plight. Over the last several years, we have worked tirelessly to rescue hundreds of birds from abandonment, neglect, and abuse. When working with animals, it becomes immediately apparent that they all have one thing in common – the will to live, and to live their lives in peace, comfort, and safety. Domestic fowl make up over 95% of the animals used in agriculture. This means that each year, billions of chickens, ducks, turkeys, geese and other birds are confined in horrific conditions for the duration of their short, miserable lives, before being brutally killed. Domestic fowl are exploited for the bodies in more diverse and extreme ways than any other animal—they are used for their meat, eggs, and down feathers. Chicks and ducklings are also routinely purchased and gifted around Easter and used in hatching projects. With no awareness of the care they need, most of these birds will die within days, or be abandoned when their novelty wears off or they grow to be too large and messy. Even their use for meat surpasses the torture inflicted upon other animals raised for food—ducks are used to make foie gras by being force-fed enormous quantities of grain via a metal tube shoved down their throats multiple times a day until they develop fatty liver disease, at which time they are killed and their diseased livers processed into the “luxury” item. Human beings have managed to find every possible way to exploit these gentle birds. Just like our companion and farm animals, ducks and geese were domesticated by humans thousands of years ago. These years of breeding resulted in animals vastly different from their wild counterparts, both physiologically and psychologically—just as domestic dogs are different from wolves. Despite being an act of animal cruelty, as well as illegal, the abandonment of these domestic ducks and geese is a constant occurrence in parks and on lakes when they are no longer wanted. Frequently the dumpers do not realize that their actions constitute a death sentence. Domestic ducks and geese depend entirely upon the care of humans to survive, no different than our “pet” dogs. Bred for either egg or meat production, they have large bodies and small wings, rendering them flightless and unable to escape predators or to find open water when the ponds freeze in winter. They also lack the survival instincts of wild birds. When abandoned on ponds, they do not know how to forage for naturally occurring food and often starve to death. They routinely succumb to attacks from predators (including raccoons, foxes, and snapping turtles) and cruelty by humans. Most domestic ducks and geese die within 24 to 48 hours of being dumped. If they survive until winter, they face diminishing natural food sources and ponds freezing over—either fully or partially—and they cannot migrate to find water, as the wild birds do. These abandoned animals often become frozen in place on the ice. Some will freeze to death (certain breeds are especially prone to frostbite), while others find themselves helpless against attacks. The rest die of dehydration or starvation.