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My name is Courage - White Applehead Siamese-look!
I'm being cared for by
Animal Network of Orange County
Adoption process
1.

Interview

2.

Submit Application

3.

Meet the Pet

4.

Home Check

5.

Take the Pet Home

Facts about me

Breed
Siamese
Color
White
Age
Adult
Sex
Male
Pet ID
16853822-Joanna Preston
Hair Length
short

My info

Small red x Not good with kids
Small red x Not good with dogs
Small red x Not good with cats
Small blue checkmark Shots current
Small blue checkmark Spayed / Neutered

My story

Needs A Quiet Home Without Kids or Dogs

Courage is a beautiful white apple-head Siamese with big blue eyes that would be happy living in a quiet home without dogs or kids. While he lives with other cats now, other cats take the spots nearest his caregiver that he wishes he had.

Courage deserves to have all the attention and his dream would be king of his home, without so much competition for affection. Would that be the kind of home you could provide?

His favorite comfy spaces are baskets to curl up inside.

His previous home was his rescue foster family that saved him when he was a kitten from a Target parking lot when he was being chased by a “murder of crows”, which is the correct term for a flock of crows. He did not do well in his rescue home that was active with kids another cat and a Great Dane.

For more info, text DiAnna at 949-759-3646 or email at DiAnna@networkfounder.org.

Courage is being cared for by Community Animal Network, a non-profit organization founded by DiAnna Pfaff-Martin in 1996. C.A.N is a veterinary medical rescue that helps dogs and cats that need to find new homes. C.A.N. foster homes are nurture houses and animals need time to decompress after some of the unfortunate experiences of their past.

Fostering is a wonderful way to help and also consider adopting by getting to know different animal’s that fit with your family’s lifestyle.

To help by donating, use our PayPal link: www.PayPal.Me/CommunityAnimal Or Mail checks to: Community Animal Network P.O. Box 8662 Newport Beach, CA 92658

The founder of Community Animal Network, DiAnna Pfaff-Martin, is a feline expert with over 25 years of active rescue experience and is very particular about the nurturing of the animals to discover their needs to be happy in their future home.

“The Community Animal Report”, DiAnna wrote and self-published in the 1990’s standing in public places handing her paper out and helping private parties rehome their pets through her classified section called, “Pre-Loved Pets”.

In 1998 she was offered to write a weekly column called the, “Pet Of the Week” for the Los Angeles Times Daily Pilot Community Newspaper. DiAnna wrote the “Pet of the Week” for 18 years until 2016.

With DiAnna’s experience, feral kittens are tamed to "pet quality" and rescue cats that are shy are disclosed and termed, "rescue quality" with a lower placement fee and these special kitties often blossom in just the right home.

 

All future pet-parents receive valuable information about cat care in a two hour "feline pet-parenting consultation" that focuses a lot on the health and safety of the cat. The most current information is made available about how to keep your cat healthy, pet foods, litters and DiAnna’s specialty is “Make Cats Happy!

Community Animal Network animals have all customary rescue veterinary medical and are microchipped with the AVID microchip and registered in the national pet-recovery database included in the placement fee and the animals come with a 30 day heath commitment and return policy.



 

 



November 19, 2022, 12:15 am
Rescue

Animal Network of Orange County

Contact info
Pet ID
16853822-Joanna Preston
Contact
Address
P.O. Box 8662, Newport Beach, CA 92658
Donation

Their adoption process

1.

Interview

Please share about yourself, work schedule, children and others in the home, current pets and the ones from the past and where they are now.

2.

Submit Application

We accept the application after the interview. Be mindful of sharing personal information with strangers. Scams are even in pet adoption!

3.

Meet the Pet

Our animals live in private homes and you will be introduced to the caregiver first by phone before the application and meeting the pet.

4.

Home Check

We ask that you submit short video clips / photos of the areas around your home and all areas the pet would have access to including outdoor

5.

Take the Pet Home

Feline Pet-Parenting – learn to choose pet foods, common symptoms of diseases, cat litters to avoid, how to choose a vet, cat care.

Additional adoption info

Your adoption comes with a “free” vet exam at The Cat Care Clinic, Orange, CA and includes a two-hour Feline Pet-Parenting Consultation. Your new pet has been blood tested for common disease’s, (feline aids & feline leukemia), vaccinated, dewormed, has no fleas.

An AVID microchip is implanted and the chips registration in the National Pet-Recovery Data Base is included. A 30-day health commitment protects your pet, too.

Go meet their pets

Appointments Made To Meet Our Pets In The Caregiver's Home!

More about this rescue

We adopt kittens in pairs believing all young beings should have a playmate of the same species, similar age.

Our foster parents help match the pairs of "best play buddies)

The animals are in private homes and well-loved.

All the rescue organizations are not the same. We all get them from the same places, but well-socialized kittens are not easy to come by.

We specialize in “pet-quality” cats and kittens. A pet-quality cat has had positive experiences with humans and has felt loved. Many of our kittens like to be carried and held and would make great family members.

Kittens that have not been well-socialized or handled a lot avoid people, hide and are jumpy and are often described as independent and aloof or abused.

Why do we promote our kittens in pairs?

All young animals need a playmate. They learn social skills through play-fighting. Kittens need an “equal energy” playmate to interact with. Just like kids picking friends, they pick someone who likes to do the same things. Biting and attacking ankles may be cute when a kitten is small, but a full grown cat can bite hard. Behaviors that the public dislike are created by not making the best choice for the animals. Adopting a pair of young animals that have the same energy level that were well-socialized is the best choice.