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Puppies and dogs in Bonham, Texas

Looking for a puppy or dog in Bonham, Texas? Adopt a Pet can help you find a new best friend near you.

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Adopt a dog in Bonham, Texas

These adorable dogs are available for adoption in Bonham, Texas. To learn more about each adoptable dog, click on the "i" icon for fast facts, or their photo or name for full details.
We'll also keep you updated on Bobby's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Bobby

Bobby

Great Pyrenees Maremma Sheepdog

Male, Adult
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) X-Large 101 lbs (46 kg) or more
Details
Good with dogs, Spayed or Neutered,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website.Bobby's mom is a Great Pyrenees/Maremma who has spent her life as a working livestock guardian dog, first in Kansas and later in Texas. Bobby was raised with goats, and had some exposure to chickens, but always seemed more interested in playing with the other dogs than in protecting the livestock. We moved him into the house for some basic training, such as how to walk on a leash, as well as crate-training and house/potty-training. He also got a refresher course in good manners around chickens. He did really well with all of these changes, but didn't really seem HAPPY in the house, so we moved him into one of our paddocks. Bobby seems happier living outside, but will come in the house if that's what you ask. He has good guardian instincts as far as walking the perimeter and barking when he hears coyotes. We think the best home for Bobby might be as a family guardian on a small homestead, where he can live outside, but be allowed to come inside during thunderstorms, which frighten him. He is very shy on meeting new people, so he needs an adopter with the patience to earn his trust. He also needs secure fencing that is at least 5' tall. He hasn't challenged the fencing at Windsong Ranch, but because of his skittishness with strangers, we don't feel safe putting him in a new home with fencing shorter than 5'. Once a fearful dog goes over the fence, it can be almost impossible to get them home again. If Bobby looks like just the companion you need in your life, please submit your application at www.bluebonnetrescue.org.Visit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am
We'll also keep you updated on Venus's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Venus

Venus

Pointer Great Pyrenees

Female, Senior
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) Med. 26-60 lbs (12-27 kg)
Details
Good with dogs, House-trained, Spayed or Neutered,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website.Although she doesn't look like it, Venus's mom was a Great Pyrenees who spent her life in the pasture guarding goats. She apparently had a rendezvous with the neighbor's Pointer, and 2 months later delivered a litter of puppies in the pasture.  The Pyrenees was owned by an elderly couple who never handled the pups or socialized them in any way. Over time, the pups grew up and some disappeared, leaving just three growing up to become adults. The elderly owners reached the point where they could no longer remain at home, so when they went into congregate care, a kind friend of the owners started feeding the dogs and asked a local vet what should be done about these remaining three feral dogs, who were almost 5 years old at this point. The vet was an old country vet who clearly had old school ways of thinking, as he said "You'll never catch 'em. Just shoot 'em." The kind friend was heartbroken to discover later that the vet had apparently made the same recommendation to someone else, who took it as a challenge, and managed to shoot one of the three remaining dogs. At that point, the friend called a local rescuer to ask for help, hoping to save the other girls. The rescuer came in, assessed the situation, and called in professional trappers. It took months to get the last two dogs into a trap, but the moment they did, the dedicated rescuer drove to Windsong Ranch in the middle of the night to bring the girls into Bluebonnet Animal Rescue. One of the sisters has a shiny black coat, and the first name that came to us was Black Beauty. But we already had a dog in our rescue named Beauty, so we named her Venus, after the goddess of beauty. Once we had chosen that name for her, since we had a pair of sisters, it was an easy leap to the name Serena for the mostly white dog. Weeks turned into months, and the sisters grew accustomed to life in one of our barn kennels (each of which has a 32' long dog run). They smiled and wagged their tails every time they saw me, but they would not allow me to get close enough to touch them. Except during thunderstorms, fireworks, and days when our neighbors were either hunting or having target practice in the empty pasture adjacent to ours. The girls are terrified of this type of loud noise, and during those events, I could sit in the kennel with them and pet them. They were literally shaking with fear. We finally decided that they were not going to make enough progress for me to get a leash on them to take them to the vet, so one at a time, I caught each girl and paid the price with scratches on my arms and legs, as the girls were still completely terrified of human touch. I loaded each girl into a crate and took her to the vet's office, where we carried the crate inside, and the vet sedated the dog while still in the crate. Then after surgery, they put the still sleeping dog back in the crate and back in the van, and home we went. At home, we carried the crate into the house and put it into our "dog infirmary" which used to be our guest bedroom but has served MANY more dogs than humans through the years. The bedroom has sliding doors that open to a patio, which has a fence to keep it separated from the rest of the yard. We put a strip of fake grass at the edge of the patio to serve as their potty area, and the bedroom and patio became the new home for Venus and Serena. Over time, with lots of treats (and patience), the girls reached the point where they would allow us to pet them, and they learned to sleep in a crate at night. The next stage in their journey of learning "how to dog" was to move to a foster home, again, one at a time, where they learned to walk on a leash. We were quite frankly amazed at how well they did! Each girl seemed to really blossom once they were in different homes, so we're guessing that as long as they had each other, they were less concerned about making attachments to people, and they were feeding each other's fear. Venus and Serena will always be shy, to the point that they are skittish with new people and new situations. But they will each make a wonderful companion in the right home. They get along with other dogs. They have nice manners in the house. They enjoy taking leash-walks. We hope the right adopter comes along and sees the beauty and sweetness in these girls that we have come to know and love. Read about our adoption process and submit your application on our website https://www.bluebonnetrescue.org/info/adoption.Visit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am
We'll also keep you updated on Bandit's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Bandit

Bandit

Border Collie Great Pyrenees

Male, Adult
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) Large 61-100 lbs (28-45 kg)
Details
Good with dogs, Not good with cats, House-trained, Spayed or Neutered,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website.When Bandit was picked up by Animal Control in rural Oklahoma, he was almost completely feral. He acted like a dog who had never had any interactions with humans -- he wasn't aggressive at all, but he definitely had ZERO trust for humans and did everything possible to avoid being touched or handled. Over many months of work, we earned his trust, and he began to act as though he actually ENJOYED interacting with us. Once Bandit reached the point where he could be handled without causing him too much stress, we took care of his veterinary needs and then moved him to a foster home where he could learn more about being a house pet. He learned to walk very nicely on a leash, and he even does well walking on a coupler with another dog. He prefers sleeping in a crate at night, and happily puts himself to bed at the end of each day. Bandit gets along really well with other dogs, and is very playful. He doesn't discriminate either -- he plays with dogs of all sizes and ages, and plays with just as many male dogs as female. He has learned to tolerate grooming, and we think he actually enjoys being brushed, which is a good thing, considering his beautiful, plush coat. When our chores are done and we sit on the sofa in the evening, Bandit is often the first one to come and sit next to us and nudge our hand with his nose to ask for some attention. He has definitely come a VERY long way from the frightened, feral dog we picked up in January of 2018. Working with dogs like this takes lots of time and patience, but the rewards are immeasurable. Bandit is still shy on meeting new people, but he definitely warms up. He does best when he has at least one other dog around who is confident/trusting of humans, because he will follow their cues. And besides, he really likes playing with another dog, so is just happier when he has a companion. If you have a friendly dog who needs a great playmate, and you are ready to commit to spending 2-3 months earning Bandit's trust, please visit our website to learn more about our adoption process and complete an application: https://www.bluebonnetrescue.org/info/adoptionVisit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am
We'll also keep you updated on Tyana's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Tyana

Tyana

Akbash Anatolian Shepherd

Female, Adult
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) Large 61-100 lbs (28-45 kg)
Details
Good with dogs, Spayed or Neutered,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website. Tyana is one of several dogs who were found on a ranch in the Texas Hill Country. We can only speculate, but we believe that the property owners moved away and left the dogs to fend for themselves.  Tyana's mom Lydia is VERY friendly, but her pups (two generations) are completely unsocialized, so we're guessing they may have been born after the people moved. It's quite possible that the Animal Control Officers who hauled away Tyana and her family were the first humans that she ever had any close contact with. At Windsong Ranch, Tyana is very slowly learning to trust me, but she is still extremely skittish of people in general. Getting her to walk on a leash in order to go to the vet's office is a real challenge, but we've managed it, and once at the vet's office, Tyana has remained calm and quiet. She seems content to stay inside the house, but seems happier and less anxious when she is outside. Tyana gets along well with other dogs and is very playful with them. We believe she would do best in a home with a confident male dog, who can help her see that humans are trustworthy. Due to her skittish nature, she MUST go to a home with secure (visible) fencing. If you are ready to make the commitment to devote yourself to earning Tyana's trust, please complete the application on our website. NOTE: I really struggle to get decent photos of Tyana -- she almost always looks very anxious, even when she's happy -- it's like she's in witness protection and thinks that having her photo taken puts her life at risk. In some of these photos, she is hanging out with other unsocialized or feral dogs, and moments before I pulled out my phone, they were usually happy and smiling, but as soon as I point the camera at them, most of them look like I might be about to kill them. Silly dogs. Also, in some photos, she has what looks like an injury diagonal across her face. Nope, that's just a berry stain. Tyana likes to dig, and it shows in some of these photos. Visit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am
We'll also keep you updated on Nell's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Nell

Nell

Great Pyrenees Brittany

Female, Adult
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) Large 61-100 lbs (28-45 kg)
Details
Good with dogs, House-trained, Spayed or Neutered,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website.Nell was just 3 months old when she, her mom, and two siblings were picked up by animal control in rural Oklahoma. They were picked up from a property where they were in the pasture with goats. Animal control had to use a catch-pole to catch them because the whole little family was showing a fair amount of fear-based aggression. Sadly, the animal control officer made the decision to euthanize one puppy, saying s/he was too aggressive. It's really hard to imagine a 3-month old puppy being so aggressive that an experienced person couldn't have dealt with the issue, but seeing that the animal control officer was willing to put down a puppy, a local person volunteered to foster mom and her remaining two puppies until she could find a rescue to take them in. When we brought them here, the puppies (whom we named Nell and Maynard) were very frightened, and they tried to avoid my attempts to touch them, but they were never aggressive. They simply acted like feral pups who had ZERO experience with humans, other than their very unfortunate interaction with animal control. Their mom (whom we named Violet) was very aggressive in her attempts to protect her puppies, so it surprised us that the mom survived and a puppy was killed by animal control. The mom's aggression made it a challenge to work with the pups, so we separated them, with mom moving into the house and the pups staying in one of our barn kennels. After she was old enough to be spayed, we brought Nell inside the house. Ironically, her mom Violet acted like she didn't know Nell at all, but another one of our Great Pyrenees mix adult females acted as a surrogate mom to her. They shared a giant 54" crate at night and usually went outside for potty breaks together. Nell was making a little bit of progress in learning to trust me, but then we moved her and her brother to another foster home where we hoped they would get  more attention than we could give them and make more progress. Unfortunately, even after two years in that home, we didn't see any real progress, so we moved Nell and Maynard back to Windsong Ranch. They are once again moving in the right direction -- they are learning to walk on a leash and to sleep in a crate.  They are still very skittish, but they will go outside to take care of their potty business and then come back in the house. They observe the other dogs and sometimes engage in play with them. Mostly it seems that Nell and Maynard are learning what it means to be a house dog with people who love them. We try to pet each one every time we walk past them, maybe just a 5-second interaction, but it gets repeated multiple times a day, with the hope being that our persistence and consistency in having positive interactions with them will show Nell and Maynard that we can be trusted, that not all humans are terrible people. We would love to find a foster or adopter for Nell who could help her move to the next level in her journey to being a family pet. We think she would do best in a home with another dog who is confident, who loves their humans, and who would enjoy playing with Nell.  Taking her on a daily leash walk could help improve her skills and increase her confidence. If you have the patience and compassion to love Nell and work with her to overcome her difficult start in life, please complete the application on our website at www.bluebonnetrescue.org.  Visit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am
We'll also keep you updated on Lindsey's adoption status with email updates.
Photo of Lindsey

Lindsey

Great Pyrenees Border Collie

Female, Adult
Whitewright, TX
Size
(when grown) Med. 26-60 lbs (12-27 kg)
Details
Good with dogs, Not good with cats, House-trained, Spayed or Neutered, Shots are up-to-date,
Story
You can fill out an adoption application online on our official website.Lindsey was pregnant when she was picked up by animal control in a small East Texas town. She delivered 10 pups in the shelter, but one did not survive. It's really a testament to the care that shelter staff and volunteers provided that they lost only one, as a shelter is no place for newborn puppies. The shelter posted this precious family, looking for a rescue to take them. Great Pyrenees rescues across Texas turned them down because they are obviously mixes, and the rescues were already jam-packed with dogs and pups who looked more like Pyrs. Shelter staff had no choice but to add Lindsey and all her puppies to their list for euthanasia, which would have been a sad day for everyone. Thankfully, one of our foster moms volunteered to foster the whole family, and we were happy to take them into Bluebonnet Animal Rescue. We love our Great Pyrs, but we are not limited to just one breed, so it didn't matter to us that they are mixes. We think Lindsey is a Great Pyrenees/Border Collie mix. She's friendly and playful, and loves people. Lindsey has been spayed, vaccinated, and microchipped.  She gets along well with other dogs, but can be a little bit alpha in her behavior.  She enjoys taking a dip in the wading pool to cool off in summer. Lindsey has a high prey drive and is NOT safe with livestock or cats. If you have room in your heart and home for this beautiful girl, please read about our process and submit your application on our website: https://www.bluebonnetrescue.org/info/adoption.Visit this organization's web site to see any additional information available about this pet.June 9, 2024, 10:14 am

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Dog shelters and rescues in Bonham, Texas

There are animal shelters and rescues that focus specifically on finding great homes for dogs in Bonham, Texas. Browse these rescues and shelters below.

Here are a few organizations closest to you:

Shelter

Bonham Animal Shelter

500 Industrial Ave., Bonham, TX 75418

Pet Types: cats, dogs

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Rescue

AOHT's Rainbow Bridge, Inc.

Flat Iron Ranch, 3057 CR 4245, Bonham, TX 75418

Pet Types: dogs

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BAV-Braveheart Animal Volunteers

P O Box 26, None, Ravenna, TX 75476

Pet Types: cats, birds, dogs, horses, rabbits, reptiles, small animals

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Bluebonnet Animal Rescue Network

P. O. Box 964, Whitewright, TX 75491

Pet Types: dogs

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Canine Karma

Whitewright, TX 75491

Pet Types: dogs

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MUTTY PAWZ

PO Box 222, Bells, TX 75414

Pet Types: dogs

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Red Dog Haven

Tom Bean, TX 75489

Pet Types: dogs

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Commerce Humane Association

661 CR4818, Wolfe City, TX 75496

Pet Types: cats, birds, dogs, rabbits, small animals

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Rescue

Lonestar Pyrs and Paws Rescue

PO Box 128, Merit, TX 75458

Pet Types: dogs

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Sacred Paws Dog Rescue

P.O. Box 332, Van Alstyne, TX 75495

Pet Types: dogs

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